Reviews 

Book Review: The Gospel According to Ruth

The Gospel According to Ruth by Iain D. Campbell My rating: 3 of 5 stars I decided to read this short book as part of my regular Bile study and took a chapter a day approach. The first thing to note is this is essentially a book of sermons and is all too evident all too often that this is material primarily to be listened to rather than read. If you can read it with a Scottish accent in your head you’ll probably imagine what it would have been like…

Read More
Links 

The Curiosity Index (09.01.2019)

Dementia in the trans-physical age This from Andrew Haslam about his Dad (who I know and hugely respect) is sad, moving and wise. My dad can’t remember my name any more. It’s unspeakably sad, not least because he is only in his mid-sixties. He knows he likes me, and even trusts me, but he’s not sure why. He often affirms that I’m ‘a good man’ and I respond by telling him that I love him, but that only elicits a confused look which seems to ask, Why? While my dad…

Read More
Reviews 

Book Review: Prelude to Foundation

Prelude to Foundation by Isaac Asimov My rating: 3 of 5 stars Set in a multi-planetary future some 20,000 years the Galactic Empire is in technological decay. Too vast, too unwieldy and racked by power games – innovation has ceased, sciences and skills are being forgotten (like weather forecasting)and populations are shrinking. Into this comes mathematician Hari Seldon with a new proposal, how to quantify and calculate the various probabilities of the future of civilisations. He has only shown that his theory is possible but he has no idea how…

Read More
Reviews 

Book Review: When breath becomes air

Death, it awaits us all but few of us think about that very much. Even less of us live as if that fact is important. We live as if life will just carry on until one day it doesn’t and we, despite all the overwhelming evidence, find that somehow shocking. Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer at the age of 36. When Breath Becomes Air  is his moving account of his journey from neurosurgeon to cancer patient. From driven student to doting father and from life to death.…

Read More
Reviews 

Book Review: Stepping into the Impossible

Stepping into the Impossible: The Story of Healing on the Streets by Mark Marx My rating: 3 of 5 stars Mark Marx has pioneered a remarkably simple model called Healing on the Streets (HOTS) for taking the church onto the streets. Simply show up consistently in your town and inviting people who need some form of healing to receive prayer. This book will challenge the sceptic and the cynic because it’s full of remarkable healing stories. At the same time it’s remarkably down to earth which is a rare combination. Stepping into…

Read More
Articles 

Why I’m learning about sleep

There are many mysteries in life and many great unanswered questions. One of them surprisingly is, ‘why do we need to sleep?‘ No one really knows. There are all sorts of theories but no conclusive answers, yet one thing is clear: need it we do. Take a look at this from John Hopkins Medicine So increased risks of heart disease, cancer, obesity, depression, and if you happen to be driving: death. These things we do know and the science seems undeniable. There have been Christians in the past such as…

Read More
Reviews 

Book Review: Them

The world is full of conspiracies and when you meet the people that really believe them, the truth gets blurry. Jon Ronson’s account of his time with extremists; from the Ku Klux Klan, to Islamic fundamentalists and his attempts to infiltrate the Bilderberg group ; is funny, weird and revealing. It’s funny because Ronson is such an engaging writer. In an almost unfiltered way  he brilliantly juxtaposes the ordinary details of a scene with the eccentricities of the characters and the bizarreness of their beliefs which leaves you laughing at…

Read More
Reviews 

Book Review: Christians, Muslims & Islamic Rage

Christians, Muslims, And Islamic Rage: What Is Going On And Why It Happened by Christopher Catherwood My rating: 2 of 5 stars This book was one of the many post 9/11 attempts to answer a question that many in the West had previously been oblivious to: why are so many Muslims so angry at the West? In other words why do they hate us? Written in 2003 it was inevitable that this book would show some signs of ageing, most notably when the author tried to engage in contemporary geo-politics.…

Read More