Christian Living Links 

Rediscovering hospitality (bumper links edition)

I noticed this year more books, talks and articles on the subject of hospitality than ever before. A lot of it was sparked by the release of Rosaria Butterfield’s book The Gospel comes with a Housekey. I’ve long been convinced of the importance of hospitality and we attempt to practice it too. So it was natural for me to bookmark and to share. The Gospel comes with a housekey Rosaria Butterfield Calls You to (Radically Ordinary) Hospitality (TGC) Radically Ordinary Hospitality by JD Greear 3 Ways to Show Up—and Speak Up—to the Lost (TGC) Christian…

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Articles 

Seeking the good life

On Sunday when our church gathered to worship we did so as a church mostly made of people from elsewhere. There were those in Sweden because they married a Swede giving them the right to stay. There were those who moved for work – educated, employable, desirable – giving them the right to stay. There were those from Syria who have fled hardship, some from Malaysia fleeing religious persecution and then there were a few who just wanted to find a better life than the one on offer in their…

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Links 

The Curiosity Index (10.05.2018)

When Smart People Are Stupid The smarter you are, the more susceptible you may be to imbibing secondhand unverified information and passing it off as your considered opinion, in essence, to make yourself look clever. As if that ever happens. Everyday courage Hospitality isn’t just about making space for others in your home, it’s about making space for them in your heart. I can’t expect that lady from Foodbank to come to my home, let alone my church, if I’m too scared to go to hers. If I say I love…

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Links 

The Curiosity Index (26.04.2018)

Stop Making Hospitality Complicated Habits of hospitality, on the other hand, are downright subversive in our culture of independence and calculation. They demonstrate that it is not only possible but fruitful and beautiful to share life in a substantive way outside the confines of the nuclear family. And, in so doing, they point to the reality of the common good, not just as a theoretical concept but as a practical one that can animate an authentic Christian community. Also this Why Read Philemon? Ten Reasons Scott McKnight gives you ten…

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Articles 

Rediscovering Hospitality

In Japan lonely senior citizens (especially women) are shoplifting in search of the community and stability of jail. From 1980 to 2015, the number of seniors living alone in Japan increased more than sixfold, to almost 6 million. That’s quite extreme but all across the developed world it has become clear that loneliness is a killer and it is an epidemic. Alongside the rise of loneliness has been the decline in religious commitment. What this has revealed is that religion creates a huge amount of social capital. Social capital here is really just…

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Links 

The Curiosity Index (21.02.2018)

Does It Bother You That God Barred Moses from the Promised Land? From Trevin Wax: For a long time, I was bothered by the fact that God didn’t allow Moses into the Promised Land. I sympathized with Moses in his one moment of weakness, and I wondered if God judged him too harshly. I was also bothered by the fact I was bothered. A 5 minute theology of periods But more than that, periods are very much part of the way women experience the world as embodied creatures. God has…

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Links 

The Curiosity Index (14.02.2018)

Why Hospitality Is Vital to Church Planting I recently unloaded a whole ton of thoughts on Twitter about hospitality. This is a good summary of the whys and hows of hospitality. By opening up our hearts and homes to others in hospitality, we experience fellowship within the Christian community (Rom. 12:13; 1 Pet. 4:9), and we can do mercy ministry and evangelism toward those outside the Christian community (Luke 14:12). How did Valentine’s Day become so commercial—and is it a bad thing? Valentine’s Day has certainly contributed to the way western…

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Christian Living 

A starved, skinny, under-nourished form of hospitality

Recently a number of posts on hospitality have shown up in my blog feed. Discussions about scruffy hospitality or discovering that hospitality is about friendship not impressing people and learning that it really isn’t about entertaining. Yet there’s something about all of them, commendable though they are, that makes me a little sad. I think it’s a sad reflection over the state of the church where we have embraced a starved, skinny and under-nourished form of hospitality instead of the more robust Biblical version. As Leanna Shepard argues in this post about gospel-driven hospitality If…

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