People at the conference Church 

Pioneer CONFERENCE 2019

I don’t go too many conferences each year although sometimes I feel like I could spend my whole year doing nothing but go to meetings and conferences. So the ones I do go to had better be worth it, right? When you live in Sweden an end of September conference in Malaga is an excellent reason to go. Swapping autumn for summer for a few days was a pleasant experience and being able to eat outside late into the night was a treat. The second and more important reason was…

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Links 

The Curiosity Index: Week 43

The Week’s Postings Wednesday: Church planting in EuropeThursday: The only intelligent life?Friday: What if We Nuke a City? Also thankful to King’s Church Norwich for letting us introduce ourselves to their church Related Reading Cross-Cultural Church Planting: A Plea From A Missionary So What Does Church Planting Actually Look Like? Six Thoughts After Six Years of a Public Church Plant 5 years and still going… From the archives Porn: How to talk about it & what to do about it Bonus Material Seven posts that caught my eye recently Holy infographics:…

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Church 

Church planting in Europe

At the end of September I was privileged to be at one of my favourite conferences. I don’t go to many but this is my favourite. For one it was held in Malaga, so while Sweden was fast heading into a cold and wet autumn, for a few days I got to go back to summer. Malaga is also a beautiful city, with ancient Roman ruins, a marina full of expensive yachts, the castle & cathedral. It’s definitely worth a visit. But nice as the weather and location was, I’d…

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Reviews 

Book review: Apostolic Church Planting

Apostolic Church Planting: Birthing New Churches from New Believers by J.D. Payne My rating: 3 of 5 stars This short book on church planting is a contribution to the conversation around disciple-making movements (DMM) and Church Planting Movements (CPM). It offers a clear model, a clear pathway and a clear theology for the methods it outlines. The strongest conviction that the book outlines is that new churches should come from new believers and that where you see groups of new believers come to faith in Jesus they should constitute a…

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Christian Living Featured Posts Links 

The BIG resource on discipleship, mission & church

I’ve been collecting resources on church planting, discipleship and mission and I’ve decided the best way to use them is to just put them all into one resource page. Admittedly a lot (but not all) come from Saturate – so you could just go there, but not all of them. Hopefully you’ll find it useful and I’ll try and update it as I find new useful stuff. Mission Framework for Missional Christianity An 11 part series by Alan Hirsch Recovering Missional Moxie An 8 part series from Alan Hirsch 10 contentions about Christian pioneering…

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The Curiosity Index (14.06.2018)

The Demise Of The Soul Of Evangelicalism Scot McKnight fires off some salvos about the decline of evangelicalism. Pride is no longer accorded those who faithfully read and teach the Bible, who glory in the cross of Christ, who preach conversions and transformations, and who are engaged in a piety- and evangelism-based activism that encompasses the whole person. The center of gravity of too much of evangelicalism has shifted away from these crumbling core themes to something else, but in the process evangelicalism has lost its soul. Church Planting in…

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The Curiosity Index (11.06.2018)

Ok, back in the saddle. Secularizing Kingdom I want to get to the discussion I had afterwards with one of our students. She told me she admired her sister who was now at work in a major social service organization because she was doing “kingdom” work. I’ve heard this so many times I think I can put it this way: For many, “kingdom work” means “social” justice while “church work” means “spiritual life.” A big fat hogwash all over this idea. Yes and amen. Church Planting is not the Single-Most…

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Church 

How Many Christians?

Philip Jenkins asks, ‘how many Christians were there in the year 200?‘ and the answer is not very many. At least not when you consider the population of the Roman Empire. For the sake of argument, let us suggest a global Christian population of perhaps 250,000. That represents a stunning expansion from the small groups we glimpse in apostolic times, but the number is tiny when we think of the vast geographical extent of the large world, from Mesopotamia to Britain. It is also a tiny fraction of that world…

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