Links 

The Curiosity Index (11.01.2019)

The “Judge Judged in Our Place”: Substitutionary Atonement Reclaimed A challenge here from Roger Olsen: If a person rejects substitutionary atonement I only care about two things: 1) Has he or she grappled sufficiently with the New Testament identifications of Jesus Christ with the “Suffering Servant” of Isaiah? and 2) Has he or she really understood traditional, historical substitutionary atonement correctly? I often find these tasks not yet finished by those who out of hand reject substitutionary atonement—often because they cannot seem to escape the distortions that surround it in…

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Links 

The Curiosity Index (27.09.2017)

Jesus Didn’t Die So He Could Love You Glen Scrivener: “If I’m looking at the Son lifted up on the cross, then I’m seeing God’s love for me because there I’m seeing my salvation. I’m seeing infallible proof of God’s immovable, inexhaustible, unfathomable affection for me.” Yes. Disconnected by Disaster—Photos From a Battered Puerto Rico This is what a hurricane does. Why You Shouldn’t Slog Through Books Another yes. The better idea is to read what seems awesome and interesting to you now and to let your curiosities grow organically. A…

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Articles 

Is atoning sacrifice absent in Paul’s scheme of salvation?

I’ve recently been working on digitizing most of my papers and files from university days and stumbled across a few interesting finds. One of those was this feisty article by Bradley H McLean. McLean opens with the acknowledgement that ‘Christ’s death constitutes the theological centre of gravity for Paul’s entire soteriology’ and that most scholars have just presumed that this idea of Christ’s expiatory death is based on the Jewish idea of sacrifice and atonement. Not so argues McLean. His case is made on five key points: Sacrifice does not atone for…

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The most repugnant idea ever

Christmas has been tamed but at its heart it is scandalous, shocking and offensive. I’ll let Richard Dawkins explain why. Dawkins was (over) reacting to the Pope’s Thought for the Day on the BBC yesterday. “(this is)…the centrepiece of what Ratzinger actually did say in his Thought for the Day. ‘Christ destroyed death forever and restored life by means of his shameful death on the Cross.’ More shameful than the death itself is the Christian theory that it was necessary. It was necessary because all humans are born in sin.”…

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This empty tomb

Friday was the day of the heavy cross, but that was only Friday and today is Sunday. Today there is an empty cross but that is not the good news. The good news is that today there is an empty tomb. Jesus has risen. I’m glad (in some ways) that the world chooses to largely ignore Easter and go shopping, because at least then we don’t face the same secularising effects that we have at Christmas, but in other ways it mystifies me that so many would choose to ignore…

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This heavy cross

Today was one of new experiences for me. For the first time I took part in a walk of witness in my local area and for the first time I carried a cross. Over the course of an hour a good number of us from at least three churches walked, sang, read scripture and prayed. I’m not sure how effective the witness bit was in the sense that it was a residential area and no one in particular seemed to be paying much attention but it was witness – we…

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God punished Christ?

As a result of Adrian Warnock posting again on the atonement I moved The Atonement Debate up my reading list. Since the debate began nearly four years ago I’ve found myself having some questions about how penal substitutionary atonement has been preached and explained. However I.Howard Marshall’s chapter ‘The Theology of the Atonement’ is excellent and I find myself in almost total agreement. However he says this, “It is not a case of God punishing Christ but of God in Christ taking on himself the sin and its penalty. Indeed,…

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