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The Curiosity Index (18.09.2017)

Hope you all had a good weekend. The best of all possible worlds? A fascinating insight into research that looks at the ‘fine tuning’ of the universe. Investigators of fine tuning look, for example, at physical parameters ranging from the weight of a subatomic particle to the cosmological constant that regulates the expansion of the universe, and ask what everything would have been like if those numbers had been any different. In many of these counterfactual universes, slightly altered physical constants yield, when plugged into the mathematical machinery of physics,…

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The Curiosity Index (05.09.2017)

Why you should read more about religion I suspect that most of the people reading this blog don’t need convincing on this but here’s why someone who doesn’t believe (Tyler Cowen) thinks religion is important. Flying spaghetti monsters and the quest for religious authenticity As this so-called Pastafarianism has grown, some branches of the FSM church have started demanding the rights and privileges enjoyed by more established religious organizations. What started as a fake religion is now angling to be an authentic one. Oh the irony. Where Do All Those…

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The Curiosity Index (23.06.2017)

So not exactly back to a daily rhythm yet…anyhoo. Happy midsummer for all you optimists. For everyone else, the evenings are getting shorter… Why Biblical Archaeology matters Catherine McDowell explains at the TGC using the fall of Lachish as her example. In the video below, the amazing connections of the Cyrus Cylinder bring light to the trustworthiness of the Hebrew Scriptures. Is the ESV Literal and the NIV Gender Neutral? Bill Mounce shows how no translation is literal or neutral. Where religious freedom is restricted most You can probably guess which…

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The Curiosity Index (17.05.2017)

Has the UK hit peak secular? This article in the Guardian wonders if the decline of religion in the UK has hit its nadir. Its findings tally with this study that cognitive biases don’t explain religion, after all. In fact the most important thing Christians can do in Western Europe is to show their children what being a Christian looks like. In this work of renewal it’s important that we know how to plant a church and not just start a service. Or you could just spend your whole building…

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The Curiosity Index (12.05.2017)

Working well, worshipping well and waiting well A good article on work being a part of you worship by Jonathan Durke. Wherever you are, whatever you are doing, whoever you are doing it with and however it is being done, do it well. The first step in pursing where you believe you are called to be is to do well what you already are doing. Jesus said that someone who is faithful in a little will be faithful with a lot. If you work well with the little you have…

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Friday curiosities

I continue to rummage through my ever growing collection of articles that have been saved for a rainy day, here is an eclectic mix for a Friday. You all know about Amazon because that’s where we shop, but that’s arguably not the most important thing they do. If the servers at Amazon Web Services were to go down then no more Netflix. Spotify. Instagram. Airbnb. Gulp. The Book Thing may be the biggest free book shop in the world. This is from way back in April but still, the genius of clockmaker John Harrison is…

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Friday curiosities

A building theme this week to distract you before the weekend. From tree churches in New Zealand to AT-AT shaped Saunas in Sweden we have nowhere near, it all. Talking of saunas – the world’s largest sauna has just moved from Norway to Greenland. That may sound crazy but nowhere near as crazy as the guys who wanted to build Minas Tirith in Worcestershire. They fell only slightly short of their $1.8 billion crowdfunding target. But unlikely buildings do pop up in unlikely places. Like the King Chulalongkorn Memorial for example. It is an ornate…

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The Curiosity Index (10.04.2015)

There’s definitely a building theme to today’s links…so there’s that. First Jeremy Williams identifies three different shades to being green An argument against bigger cities: Why increasing urbanization is neither natural nor inevitable nor good for us Dubai is in another construction boom, the BBC asks can it last? While Africa has it’s own construction boom The Economist wonders if the skyscraper curse is real And here are 7 futuristic cities to save mankind that all float but will never happen, sadly. Lastly on a different note: how to cure hiccups – what works for…

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