Gender myths and other stuff

Following my post last week on fighting over Junia, there have been a few more posts worth mentioning on the subject of gender roles. Firstly, in my opinion, Andrew Wilson has written an excellent post busting twenty myths in the gender debate and has been very even-handed busting ten from each side! To demonstrate why this whole debate matters and generates a lot of heat and passion, let me give you a couple of examples that I’ve read recently. Firstly Paul Levy wrote about reaching men in university and then this…

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Christmas, consumers, gifts and gratitude

For a blog that is supposed to have a focus on consumerism and generosity it’s been a while since I posted on the subject. However, I have been stacking up a substantial backlog of posts that I’ve noticed but not quite managed to write about it. This post both clears the decks and gives plenty of food for thought. If you hadn’t noticed it’s nearly Christmas, that time of year where we go slightly loco with money and stuff, and it’s a unique event. Rampant consumerism and the celebration of…

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Book Review: Generous Justice

I’m rapidly becoming a big fan of everything Tim Keller writes (I previously reviewed Counterfeit Gods) because, well, he just seems to make so much sense. In Generous Justice: How God’s grace makes us just Keller explores how the motivation for acts of compassion and justice are rooted in the grace of God to us in Christ. It’s this connection that makes this book stand out from many of the other books on social justice. Keller has four main groups in his sights as he writes; those keen on social justice…

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Doug Wilson, the apostle Paul and bad economics

He’s done it again, with a sharp pen and elbow, Doug Wilson has wound me up. Fortunately for me, I’m right and he’s wrong. I think. In this post (HT: Andrew Wilson) Wilson poses a thought experiment where you can double the incomes and welfare of the least but in doing do increase the wealth of the richest tenfold at the push of a button. He ends with this, “This is your ethical “dilemma,” and part of your test is whether or not you even think of it as a dilemma.…

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Now he knows: Christopher Hitchens 1949-2011

As you may have heard Christopher Hitchens, atheist and author, is dead. It’s worth reading the post by Justin Taylor and the obituary by Douglas Wilson. For most of his life Hitchens argues that those who believed in God were deluded. One way or the other there are no delusions now for Christopher Hitchens. Either he knows nothing because ‘he’ no longer is, he is gone, shuffled off this mortal coil and that’s it, his body to be burned or eaten by worms. Or, now he sees God, yesterday he knew…

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Miscellaneous: 7 links

Dave Matthias has a good post on why he blogs Are you more likely to give if someone asks you or not? Freakonomics looks deeper Joe Snelling has a think about books, facebook and community This weeks infographic shows you where not to own a cheese shop This explains why if a massive skyscraper is being built in your city you can expect the economy to tank Michale Hyatt has a good post on how a shift in vocabulary can change your attitude. Although you might need an attitude shift…

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Bored of Facebook

I think the title just about sums it up really. A while ago I made some changes to how I used Facebook because I was aware I was using Facebook primarily to distract me from the tasks at hand. The net result being that I more or less stopped looking at Facebook. Now I go on maybe about two minutes a day and not every day either. I think the fact that my Mum is on Facebook might have something to do with it. There are tons of ways to…

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