Bibliophilia (30.12.2010) *updated*

Here’s my last round up of book reviews and things for 2010. As always peruse, use and read! Reviews Charles Crosland has read Eric Metaxas’ biography of Bonhoeffer: Pastor, martyr, prophet, spy Tim Challies has reviewed The Death of the Grown Up by Diana West. Great idea. Tim says, ‘If West is correct, our society needs to grow up and needs to do so before it is too late.’ Gary McMurray has read Disciplines of a Godly Man by R Kent Hughes, ‘Areas of life perhaps never considered before are…

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I link therefore I am (31.12.2010)

I’m not sure there’s anything remarkable in this bunch of links but there you go. I hope you all have enjoyed reading this blog during the past year, I’m very grateful and thankful that you have and I hope you’ll carry on in 2011. It’s going to be an eventful year. Please take time to leave a comment every now and then which would be most appreciated. Happy New Year and hope 2011 will be a year of grace for you. I’m with Tim Chester on this one. A good…

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Reviews: 2010

These are the books I’ve managed to read this year. It’s the most since I started blogging. Maybe next year I’ll manage 50! The Way Forward? Christian Voices on Homosexuality & the Church Silent Savior by AJ Gregory Status Anxiety by Alain de Botton You are the treasure I seek by Greg Dutcher Crazy Love by Francis Chan Enough by John Naish Virtual Integrity by Daniel Lohrmann Success by Simon Coupland Pegasus Bridge by Stephen Ambrose Blood & Sand by Frank Gardner Forgotten God by Francis Chan Just Politics edited…

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Book Review: Audio, Video and Media in the Ministry

I don’t know why I was selected to review this book, I’m not particularly qualified but I reviewed it for Christianity magazine, so here it is.   ‘The importance of the media team in enhancing the church’s ministry cannot be overstated’. I beg to differ. There’s no question that these days any church embracing technology (even as basic as a microphone or projector) needs competent and servant-hearted people who will selflessly and often thanklessly make things work. However, in many places the church manages to grow quite well without ever…

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Simplifying my digital life

I spend quite a lot of time (too much in all likelihood) online as the internet has become ever more useful and interlocked into how we do things. Basic things that once required pen and paper are now done online. I’ve noticed that as someone with reasonably high levels of curiosity I’ve signed up to loads of different things. I’ve probably dozens and dozens of accounts, my email address(es) liberally scattered over the interweb. This leads to clogging of my inbox and an increase in spam and junk mails but…

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Looking ahead to 2011

In terms of decision making 2010 was quite a year and in 2011 I get to follow through on some of those decisions. There are a number of challenges ahead: In January we launch Hope Church and as a church begin Just 10. We’ll also apply to universities in Sweden. At the end of January I’ll bring some teaching from Philippians to York CU at their houseparty. In February I visit Sweden and try and work out where we’ll live for 9 months or so, plus pray and fast with…

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My ten (now eleven) most popular posts of 2010 *updated*

It’s often fascinated me which posts have caught the attention both of the regular reader and occasionally wider afield. Those posts aren’t always the ones I spend most time on or the ones I care most about. So here are my ten most popular posts of the past year (book reviews have been stripped out as that was another post). *updated 27.12.2010 due to some late blog post reading* It was bound to happen… By far and away the most read post all year. In the wake of the media…

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The most repugnant idea ever

Christmas has been tamed but at its heart it is scandalous, shocking and offensive. I’ll let Richard Dawkins explain why. Dawkins was (over) reacting to the Pope’s Thought for the Day on the BBC yesterday. “(this is)…the centrepiece of what Ratzinger actually did say in his Thought for the Day. ‘Christ destroyed death forever and restored life by means of his shameful death on the Cross.’ More shameful than the death itself is the Christian theory that it was necessary. It was necessary because all humans are born in sin.”…

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