Church 

Shapers of culture

One of the reasons to reach a city, if not the reason, is to influence a culture. However a new shaper of culture is emerging that has nothing to do with the city in fact it has very little to do with any geographical location at all. The internet. Nothing, TV and movies included, will prove to be as instrumental in both creating and undermining a global culture than the internet. Ultimately it could even undermine the role of the city as the birthplace of culture. Here are a few…

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The city, the culture and the church

This will probably begin a series of posts on the above, following on from the thought provoking teaching of Dr Tim Keller, whom I heard the other day on this subject. He made the case for the church engaging the culture and reaching cities. Cities he argues, rightly, are the centres of commerce, culture, art, law, politics, justice and right now for the first time ever more than 50% of the world’s population live in cities. You can’t ignore the city. I totally agree. However, there were some working assumptions…

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What you've been reading (26/02/09)

Some good reviews as always, which will hopefully encourage you to make reading a priority Lex Loizides writes a good review of John Humphry’s Lost for Words Tim Challies reviews The One True God by Paul David Washer Mark Heath reviews Shane Claiborne’s The Irresistible Revolution Jeremy has read Maxed Out by James Scurlock I’ve reviewed The Kite Runner, the third Harry Potter book and CJ Sansom’s novel Sovereign This is good from Tim Challies on how he reads and learned to read more

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I am an idiot, Tim Keller is not

I don’t know if you’ve ever had the experience of asking a question and it all coming out wrong? I had that. I was at a day conference in London where Tim Keller was the speaker. He was excellent. The theme was influencing the city, following on from Mark Driscoll last July talking about that. Keller was very balanced, he went out of his way to say that we need churches anywhere there are people, so rural, village, suburban, urban but then went on to argue for the primacy of…

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Lent

The evangelical tradition I grew up in was never one for all the seasons and saints, high days and holy days of the traditional churches. Up until recently I had only a vague understanding of Lent (it’s still quite vague) but I do know lots of people give up things for Lent, and on the whole that’s probably good for a person. As Lent started yesterday there are lots of Lent blogging going on, so if you want to get started but only a day late. Check these out. Faith…

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Book Review: The Kite Runner

Khaled Hosseini’s first book The Kite Runner is heart achingly good. Set in Afghanistan this is a story of love, sin, betrayal and redemption. Two boys growing up in Kabul joined and kept apart by invisible ties. The heart of the book is Amir’s struggle to win his father’s love and deal with the tragedy that befalls his companion Hassan. The key phrase ‘there is a way to be good again’ strikes a chord for Amir when as an adult émigré to the US he journeys back to Afghanistan now…

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Book Review: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

I think when the Potter books were becoming a phenomenon a number of Christians were worried, concerned about these books and the insight into magic and witchcraft that lies within. Some of my friends were among those concerned so I must be careful what I say. Anyway suffice to say, I don’t think the population of warlocks and witches in the UK has gone up significantly despite the millions sold. I read the first one a year or so ago and now I’m at number 3 (having picked this one…

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